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the west which could threaten america's economic future. this program is about an hour. >> host: susan thank you for being with us. >> guest: i've been looking forward to talking with you. >> host: let's start with the basics. what is the status of broadband in america today? >> guest: the picture at america's quite different from the other developed nations. we have god for very high. >> and download. >> in america cable monopolies and local monopolies in each region of the country dominate that market. and for 85% of americans the only choice with a live will be their local cable monopolies. we don't have any of the fastest 25 cities in the world when it comes to internet access in america so we are not in the world's leaders. we are somewhere in the middle of the pack and we also have a deep digital divide so having an internet access at home is very tightly correlated to your socioeconomic status or maybe about half of the people with incomes between 30 and $50,000 a year have it at home and the number is lower for people with incomes under $30,000 a year. rich people tend to have
in america today? >> we have a picture that is quite different from the other developed nations. we have the high states of and download speeds in america cable monopolies, local monopolies and each region of the country that dominate that market and so for 85% of americans the only choice where they live is going to be at their local cable monopolists. we don't have any of the fastest 25 cities in the world when it comes to internet access in america so we are not in the world leaders we are somewhere in the middle of the pack and we also have a very deep digital divide. so having internet access at home is tied to your economic status some may be about half of people with incomes between 30, $50,000 a year have internet connections at home but that number is even lower with incomes under $30,000 a year. rich people tend to have internet access at home, and also 9% of americans can't buy internet access wherever they live because it is just not available and hasn't been billed out to their areas of that is the picture. >> host: how did we get here? it seems that the the internet started
threaten america's economic future. this program is about an hour. .. we don't have any of the fastest of the five cities in the world but comes to internet access in america, so we're not in the world leaders. we are somewhere in the middle of the pack. we also have a very deep digital divide. having inaccessible kampf is very correlated tear socioeconomic palace. -- have a people have internet connections at home, but that number is even lower for people with incomes under 30,000 per year. rich people tend to have an and also 9 percent of americans cannot access the internet revenue because it has not been built up to their area. >> added we get here? it seems like the internet was started here. what is the divide? why has it not gone to people sums? >> quite a street. a great thing about the internet is that you can reach anybody. that is the whole point. a universal a disability program all idea was that the content provider, like google, would not be subject to the lens of a telecom provider, but we have this huge split between the ideals and openness of the internet is dependent
're telling us where we live in america, the end of the suburbs. could you tell us about your title? >> guest: sure. the main idea behind the book is that after more than a half of a century of expansion into the suburbs, the suburbs are the sort of more than any other place, sort of cultural pillar of america. it's embodies the american dream. it's very -- the image of the house in suburbia is where most people live and strive for. but that is changing and it's changing pretty dramatically. these changes happen slowly but every indicator is showing this. we're tiring of this way of life, and the reason behind that are numerous, and they're complex, and they have been kind of grinding away for a number of years. but the data, the indicators out there, the sort of sense of american people who live in the suburbs, we're really looking at a seismic change in how and where we live, and i just thought that was a really momentous trend. >> host: i'll be very interested to hear about the indicators. first i wanted to know, what inspired you to write this book to look at this momentous trend? >> gues
on booktv, "after words." .. >> everybody live somewhere and you were telling us where we live in america the end of the suburbs. can you tell us about your title? guest of the main idea behind the book is that more than half a century of expansion into the suburbs the suburbs are at this sort of more than any other place the sort of cultural pillar of america. it embodies the american dream. it's the image of suburbia that people strive for and where most people live but that is changing. it's changing pretty dramatically. these changes happen slowly over time but every indicator you look at a showing this. we are tiring of this way of life and the reasons behind that are numerous and they are complex and they have been kind of grinding away for a number of years. but, the data the indicators out there, the sense of the american people who live in the suburbs we are really looking at a seismic change in how and where we live. i just thought there was a really momentous trends and one worth delving into so i did. >> host: i will be interested to hear about these indicators but first i wan
into the suburbs coming to know, the suburbs are more than any other place sort of the cultural pillar of america to read it embodies the american dream, it's very -- the image of the house in suburbia is what people strive for and where people live but that is changing coming and it's changing pretty dramatically. these changes have been slowly over time that every indicator you look at is showing this. we are tired of this way of life and the reasons behind that are numerous and complex and kind of draining away for a number of years. the debt indicators out there, the sort of sense of the american people who live in the suburbs were really looking at a sort of seismic change in how and where we live and i just thought that was a really momentous trend and one with delving into and so i did. >> host: i will be interested to hear about those indicators. but first i wanted to know what inspired you to write this book to look at this? >> guest: i kind of caught west about the headlines of the census data showing sort of whiffs of the speculative on to the radar and i thought this interesting. ther
a century of expansion into the suburbs close rappel of america. it embodies the american dream for. it's very -- the image of the house and suburbia is really what so many people strive for. that is changing. is changing pretty dramatically. @booktv so over time, but every indicator you look at a showing this. we're tired of this way of life. the reason behind that are numerous and complex and have been kind of grinding away for a ehimber of years. the indicators out there, the sort of sense of american people live in a suburb, we are really looking at as sort of seismic change in how and where we live. add to stop the was a really momentous turned and one worth telling into. >> i will be very interested to hear of those indicators, but first wanted to know, what inspired you to read this book, to look at this momentous -- >> i sort of caught with of headlines about census data showing this or housing data showing that. there were with so this a purple ne wuld announce married are a little bit. i thought that was interesting debate the sense that there ould be something bigger. i start
, that should be happening pretty soon. would that be a thing where maybe north america would be wiped out and the population, the rest of the world would have some time to adapt? or should we have built underground cities we can go to? any thoughts or comments about that? >> yeah. >> we don't have any control over -- >> we don't. you should always be working on building underground cities. so please start soon. but -- actually underground city would be great if there were a supervolcano. so the val coin know in yellow stone is actually not the same kind of volcano that ebbed the permian period. they would eject a lot of materials but the one that ended the priman was a very long-term eruption. lasted for at least a thousand years and opened big vents that were just pouring tons of lava and also all this goo into the atmosphere. another scientific term, goo. so the volcano at yellow stone would be enormous. the caldera volcano. it would collapse and there would be vents that open up and spew lava, but only last about a week, and the main devastation would be ash entering the environment, g
, also, of course, creates a tension between america and china that lasts for the next twenty years. it goes in to a deep freeze. at the same time the korean war because it enhances mao's power it creates a need for china to demand equality in the relationship with the receive yet union. mao was not going to play second fiddle to khrushchev. it was setting china on the path of where it went. should i talk about south korea too? >> host: actually, i want to talk about the lesson of the korean war as it related to vietnam. i think you already set that up in your -- , you know, in our comments. >> guest: right. >> host: both in the u.s. side and the china side. >> guest: right. >> host: i think that would be useful. >> guest: what is interesting about the lessons of, i mean, in 1956, eisenhower had the opportunity to intervene on behalf of the french. the french were moving in the china and it was a great battle, and the question whether or not the americans were going to come in and basically save the french. and eisenhower basically said no. the reason he said no was because we just
religion and especially america is so open and forman the method. that did not have to topple any giant to write this book. i received a lot of support. that said, there is a kind of protest against the standards of academic argumentation, for the reasons that i suggested earlier what i know about people, what makes people interesting, what makes people lovable. it's difficult to capture that with an academic -- with the scholarly arguments. it is precisely where people who violate your expectations of them, disappointed your supposition that they become interesting in a way that we turned to literature. our reason that when i want to no people intimately, i will turn. so that is part of it. the other part of it will be a kind of a static concern. the other part is ethical. and this is rare really hope that this book is received by our style of a community as scholarship which is that there is a kind of fun fought plane necessarily it seems to me that to be in an academic conversation binds you often to the following relationships to the people you write about. you go out, have this con
of america. and i think whoever lives in net should be. >> season to from edith roosevelt to michelle obama life monday including calls, facebook comments and tweets. monday night we will conclude the encore presentation of season one of the series with first lady ida mckinley. >> george sat down at freedom fest in las vegas to discuss his most recent book "knowledge and power" which he describes how capitalism produces wealth and benefits of society spitting it starts now one book tv. >> you are watching book tv on c-span2. we are on location at freedom fest which is a gathering of libertarians and joining us now is best-selling author and economist george gilder whose book is knowledge and power the information theory of capitalism and how that is revolutionizing our world. how many books have you now written? ..
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11